PRELUDE FOR STUDENT IN JOB HUNTING

After School and Job Hunting

"It was in those long days ago when finding employment was not such draining as today." A 56 years old public servant told me. I had just graduated with a degree in the field of health science and had applied for a voluteer position after a whole year of struggle trying to find my dream job. In the period i was frustrated to the point of relinquishing up everything including my own self-esteem. This is was not what i had expected when i started school. I had the believe that anyone who is educated from high school or up to the university or college level was destined to get a direct through-pass to employment industry but that was not  practical in the real world bearing in mind that my background was not well wealthy despite owing a few rental houses from which we collected rent every month. Much expectations and the society beliefs on the impractical education system did not work for me. My mother would tell us that if we study hard we will get that dream job we want. For her the idea was fixed and determined that her children will succeed through education.  I had hope in all and was very hardworking in my studies. Little did i know that was not the only yardstick to success especially in todays time. I had applied for many jobs while seeking all avilable opportunites in my career line but all in vain for one year. There were weakness in my application struggles and other issues which were many indeed that lead me not getting any response. I had no any practical experience (fresh from school), no focus on what i wanted in my career (no big picture), did not have a prosoective mind in my career, believed that only going to school will get me the job i learnt in school, i did not have connections or network nor wished to have one, i just thought that God saw me and He will give me the job i want if i apply an advertisement. Worst thing that led to my transformation was when i applied to join the military (Kenya Defence Forces) as a KDF Specialist in health information officer. When i got the news that i was invited for an interview i almost melted in joy, thanking God more than a 100 times. I knew my dawn was now and the much awaited time had reached....the moment to pull my menaces off my face had arrived. I was eying to get into the AIR FORCE crew with no restriction bragging hard not only that i had my certificate in my hand but due to my high school papers that were fully embbeded inline to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) that had awarded me a first qualification with an associated degree in computer science (attained with difficulties) to superscharge my second qualification with Bsc. degree in Health Records & Information Management. After the successful inverview that lasted for one week in Nairobi i sat with bated  breath with much hope and anticipation to go through as i had glipmsed my interview scores. I felt nostalgia but well determined to represent Busia County with all my heart within one week from which we were told to wait for the final confirmation on the list of the successful candidates during the interview to start Military training. In joy all the hopeful candidates waited. We all waited! Awaited, waited, waited and waited. Darkeness wrapped me in agony and i slept in nightmares. I pulled from the reality and went into a dream land wishing the unknown to be fall on me. I did not have the connections to get me through into FORCES or may be my chances to be selected were very small to null. What gave me solace was when i recollected my concioussness to find my purpose and the logic behind all the system in our normal societies feeding us with void interventions to life during school. I went introvant and locked myself into the chamber of my mother's house to rewrite my dream. How was i going to get back to reality when all i hoped for did not work? All that was not the end to life itself. I had learned some blockchain technology of life to peel off the mask in every challenge. I finnally rose up and decided to apply for an oppotunity as a volunteer at Changamwe Sub-County Health Office for one year using the failure to secure job as a catalyst to learn knowledge and skills regarding my career. I also sunk deep into self-study, learning and searching for key information. Finally the effort paid off. I had interrracted with many prospceting employers NOT forgeting that i had the experience needed for my first job.


THE LOGIC FOR ALL STUDENTS

Students hope for the best after school

When i started the journey to understand logic every fact in life was clear and elaborative. I remember a colleague of mine always used to ask me ''Mr. Hillary why is the world so opposite like this?" Unduly not worried by his question i would get my arrival to this grandiose pluck that had been construed for its performance--yet its bridled ambitions for the tomorrow people (STUDENTS) is full of slothfulness and stagnation.

 

For a complete score and some years, the people welcomed this easy and swallow-able system with much ululations without ciphering the bonnet it was germinating to the core audiences in the coming scores. Results?-- We are delayed and in-fact  I had been a victim, feeling the viscosity and the drag of its toll-free philosophy. Had it not that I made some a few acrobatic U-turns to locate my center of gravity on the ground i would have been still swimming in the dark waters.

 

I should not be marked with wrong a pen here but for the sake of your neighbor or that laborer who has relinquished the inertia to wade through study and only made pursuits to live in his child. FOR THIS FACET, I SHOULD NOT SEEK OR BARGAIN to obtrude my intuited enterprises to every hawk in the streets--those lamely and with holes in mind—

 

Then what is this facet for if its statement appears to be true but the argument within it is deeply invalid? What does that mean? Are our parents laboring in vain and whipping us for nothing if we revoke schools? Are they playing cards with teachers when they load us with hope and not works? Is the Ministry hoarding school with the notion of providing better and equitable education to its young nation? Are they not scaring their eligible consumers from molding their own tone of music while allowing the mind to be trimmed with that different beat on the board?

 

If this case had been baptized to some of us (perhaps like you reading this site), particularly I think we would have borrowed an axe once before going down to transact our own private leadership forever! To paint this image further (now going through your mind), I should begin first on how I was forced to be conjugated with verbs when at the elementary school. In a short time-span, I had delved into play and rudeness of the verbs that were at my beck and call and the habit spread into the nerves. I would only wait on the eleventh hours to flip through the leaves of books before downloading what I had read on the examination papers. Luckily i was adroit with my optical wires that had the power of a clicking camera but then that would be the end of everything in class after pelting things on the paper! I would forget almost everything concerning that exam regardless that I was clobbering As on each of the paper.

 

 Are there not many out there like I was? Preached to get As and not understand the vibration of it? We gave bravo to the Ministry after it stopped the old fogey way of banding out top schools in favour to standardize performance and to kill the mundane notion of students wanting to change or shift schools by their parents' fugitive ideas. Perhaps that effort might have mitigated but it was not an ultimate tool to eradicate the cobwebs in classrooms. Significantly because of some deficit in our chemical composition--it is difficult to eliminate this mediocrity. Then where is the hard immunity if all those to be inoculated with logic are tolling to attaining grades and running after the wind of learning exams and not mastering the techniques scripted in the codes of what study means? Is this labor under mistake if a neglected or poor man's child fails to get the element in the tide and when he is vetted they say to him: "who is your guarantor?" because of this avert corruption and the poor man's apple of the eye is rejected to find his rewarding job!?

 

Where will he start from? He did not have the mentor or the role model to guarantee him and almost spent his entire time in school parroting what he read in books. We pledge well with the vision 2030. But don't we see the danger in it? If the this child is rewarded sour grapes in return, he will have to go back to his protective shell to mine the little that was left if only there will be sufficient grace from God-- unfortunately there will be none left.

 

After delivering my logic practices in various schools I often meet young men--my townsmen who startle me that they wished to have found this light while joggling themselves with the vowels in school or perhaps to have inherited something from their fathers--because they did not have anything left and all the hopes that they had faded after they were ruined in school anchoring them to empty words. If it happens that you were in such environmental situation as me but managed to scrape through without difficulties then you are a lucky devil! But the rest of us must have been the son of 'so and so'-- this is what creates the lasting contagious corruption band that we all turn by its command.

 

Perhaps my words in the pages are skewed--do not probe me further or later. I admit to be corrupt in my own sight as everyone else. Those you hate are those I love and the circle goes on like that to infinity. In-fact I had lost my father when still a toddler. I had almost given up the power to rise again and never thought that things will ever change for the best in me. I did not know how much power was in me until when I came to consider the purpose to live, asking myself many unanswered questions about why I live? To settle the matters that kept me in pain and sorrowful I started to sketch my emotions by releasing them on a piece of paper. This step got me the meaning to live happy within the universe while in form two shaping my first writing called  Errand to the town.

 

When growing up to some point we were all occupied by school and gave respect to teachers. I sue this same gifted spirit to remain for the future generations. In regards there is the saying that school is the only factory where good men are made out of boys. This is the true facet of the school phenomenon where logic should be taught as early as possible to allow different channels of thoughts to grow as the child spurs in knowledge written in books. However how far the parent might have gone or studied the respect still falls and lands on the teacher!

 

To fix the final blow on spurring logic, I will illustrate with two real famous individual. George Boole (1815-1865), though he had only three years of formal schooling but because of his pursuits in logic he is now remembered in the world of mathematics and computing. Boole discovered the logical expressions of and, or and not which are now the widely used to form the algebraic systems explained in his book: An Investigation of the laws of Thought. May be we might have our own Booles to discover ON and OFF for poverty.

 

 Another one is Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), born in concord Massachusetts, he encouraged students to make their own observation and not to merely parrot what they read in books. As a teacher Thoreau held his classes outdoor so that the natural world could mix with academics. Thoreau also however wrote once that, "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step into the music which he hears that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak."

 

To this date, we are still dancing to the different drummer. Schools are not nurturing the palmistry sealed in the hearts of the students. This new awakening thus calls for every individual (teachers and parents or guardians) and schools to incorporate the SWOT analysis in the SPUR technique. Every child comes from a given society and community that he has the mandate to transform through wielding positive affirmations or responses instigated in his/her logic tool box which is perhaps under-seated in the sub-conscious level of the mind.

 

As it says in the old book: “drink water from your own cistern and running water from your own well—" If this hot portion is not embedded in every one of us, then we will blur the pledged industrialization vision--constructing empty wishes—

 

 

 

The Logic for Students in School

Formal Logic In Schools

 

A Study Finds That Formal Logic Can Help High School Students

 

As someone who’s recently begun studying logic, with the conviction that such effort is beneficial, it’s nice to have some empirical evidence which not only justifies my time spent in these studies, but also substantiates my assertions that other should do likewise.
Without a means of measurement, it’s hard to determine exactly how beneficial my own studies in formal logic have been. For example, if I were to detect a sound logical argument in an essay I wrote, who’s to say that I wouldn’t have produced the same sound argument without those studies (even if I hadn’t been able to formally identify it)? Your blog post, and the article which it’s based on, are solid grounds for me to defend the worth of my studies, and encourage others in the same vein. Thanks!

 

I don’t think it has limited applications at all. I’ve already explained why in quite some detail. We as human beings need to reason about things and understanding formal logic is part of reasoning. We are able to reason without formal logic with great success, but we can reason with even greater success with it.

 

Edit: In fact, I don’t see how anyone can distinguish between validity and truth without formal logic. “Validity” in the formal logical sense is a formal aspect of arguments. That is not something easy to explain to people without formal logical education. We lack a vocabulary to discuss it effectively.

 

A study provides strong evidence that an applied logic class significantly helped improve high school students’ critical thinking skills. The study was conducted by Dan Bouhnik and Yahel Giat from the Jerusalem College of Technology (in Jerusalem, Israel) and information about the study was published online in a PDF file entitled, “Teaching High School Students Applied Logical Reasoning.” (You can download it for free here.) This study is of the utmost importance because high school students in the United States are not taught about good reasoning in high school, and logic in particular is highly relevant to good reasoning. A better understanding of good reasoning can help us achieve our goals, become more ethical, avoid deception, and think for ourselves. Nonetheless, I don’t think a single news organization has published information about this study.

 

The study tested an applied logic class’s effectiveness on high school students—how helpful would this kind of class be for high school students? Would students’ reasoning skills improve? The class was given to juniors and seniors. Students were tested at the beginning of the course and at the end of the course to find how much their reasoning skills could be improved, if at all. The students were also given a “questionnaire about the course and its effect on them”.

 

The study used a year’s worth of a “college level” applied logic class that was originally meant to be a two-year college course. Only the first year’s worth of instruction was taught in detail. The class taught logical reasoning and deductions, and Boolean Algebra in detail. It then proceeded to introduce students to what would be taught in the second year, “digital systems, inductions, paradoxes, and computation”.

 

The class is meant to do the following:

 

a) Improve critical reasoning skills.

 

b) Improve ability to apply logical reasoning in speech and writing.

 

c) Improve ability to search, retrieve, analyze, and evaluate information.

 

d) Improve ability in other applied logic fields, such as computation and digital systems.

 

The ability to understand logic wasn’t only meant to be abstract or mathematical. Instead, “[t]he students were given many assignments in which they had to analyze newspaper articles, political statements, judiciary rulings, and day-to-day life situations” .

 

According to the researchers, “[t]he results suggest that the students significantly improved their critical reasoning” and “all student groups found this course important”. Many of the students reported that “they use these tools to critique and evaluate information” . Additionally, there were deficiencies found in students’ reasoning skills before taking the class, which “stresses the need for reasoning to be taught, as much improvement can be gained by such instruction”.

 

The result of this study doesn’t prove that formal logic is the most effective way to teach high school students to be more reasonable. Perhaps a philosophy course without formal logic would be even more effective. However, I personally find formal logic extremely helpful for thinking philosophically and I explain why here. In particular, it’s very difficult to understand formal validity or how to appropriately object to an argument without studying formal logic. We already intuitively understand formal logic, but our intuition often fails us and knowing more about logic can help us avoid making logical mistakes.

 

Free information regarding formal logic can be found here.

 

Logical Thinking: How to use your brain to your advantage

 

Logical thinking! You might have heard that phrase a couple of times before, but do you really know what it implies? Logical thinking is to think on the basis of knowledge, what we know, and certainties, what we can prove. The past two centuries have witnessed an unparalleled reliance on the logical approach to thinking. It is the basis on which modern technology is founded. But the flaw in logical thinking is that it relies on the conscious brain and this is the most limited and vulnerable part of our thinking. Logical thinking is the part of the brain that relates to its left-hand side (“l” for “left” and “l” for “logical”). It was Professor Roger Sperry of the University of California who discovered that different sides of the brain were responsible for different functions. He discovered that the left-brain…

 

  • governs the right side of the body

 

  • governs the right field of vision

 

  • deals with input sequentially

 

  • perceives the parts more than the whole

 

  • perceives time

 

 

 


COLLEGE GRADUATES

The good news is that all signs point to a strong hiring cycle this year for new graduates. Eight out of every 10 employers describe the college labor market as good to excellent, according to an annual survey by the Collegiate Employment Research Institute at Michigan State University, which received responses from more than 4,300 employers. Nearly 90 percent of them hired a new graduate last year, and all of them expect to hire again this year.

But even such rosy numbers won’t give parents of college seniors less anxiety about their return on the college investment until their children move out of the house and start making ends meet on their own. And for this generation of college graduates, making that transition from school to career is more treacherous now than it was for graduates even a decade ago, said Phil Gardner, director of the Michigan State employment center.

“College students are enjoying the longest run in job growth since the late 1990s, but that doesn’t mean navigating the job market is easy,” he told me.

Three primary developments in the job market make it more difficult for today’s graduates compared to their parents.

First, Gardner said, the size and makeup of companies recruiting on campuses has shifted, altering the entire hiring process. In the 1980s, campus recruiting was dominated by three primary industries— manufacturing, retail and finance— and a few big corporations controlled each of those sectors. That meant the big employers set the recruiting calendar, and everyone else followed along. It was an easy process for students and campuses to understand. In 1985, GM and Dow Chemical, combined, hired 340 Michigan State graduates, Gardner told me. In recent years, those two companies hired only a few dozen students from Michigan State.

There are more employers today, each of them recruiting fewer students, and all have specific needs and timetables for students to track. Companies that build things no longer dominate the economy; business and professional services that reorganize those old-line companies now do.

Nonprofit and government agencies also loom over hiring in a way they didn’t in the past. Teach for America and AmeriCorps are among the top 10 destinations for Michigan State graduates today, and several other nonprofit organizations fill spots in the top 15. In the 1980s, nonprofits occupied none of those spots. In a nationwide survey, more than 40 percent of the class of 2015 said they wanted to work for the government, at the federal, state or local level.

[Want more jobs? Give high school students more exposure to training for a variety of careers]

Second, employers have raised the bar on the skills workers need to start a job on day one and are less involved in employee training. Young adults are largely on their own to acquire those skills. Doing so becomes increasingly challenging because the rules keep shifting. Only a quarter of companies have specific hiring targets when they start campus recruiting, according to surveys by Michigan State.

Workplaces are engaging in more on-demand or last-minute hiring, so students can’t know even months in advance what they need to know for a job, let alone before signing up for classes or before picking a major.

“We’re asking 23-year-old new graduates to act like 35-year-old experienced workers,” Gardner said.

In the old days, Fortune 500 companies put new hires into “rotational programs” that allowed them to move around different departments to learn about the company and its culture, as well as various jobs. Many of those programs have been eliminated in corporate cost-cutting.

The third major development, according to Gardner, is the increased velocity of today’s economy. Entire industries have been disrupted by technology and globalization in recent years, even stalwarts like law, accounting and medicine.

Yet colleges are under more pressure than ever to help their students find precise routes into careers when those routes don’t exist anymore. In a 2015 survey by the Chronicle of Higher Education, two-thirds of college leaders said more discussions about job preparation were occurring on campus compared with just three years earlier.

[Is a college degree the new high school diploma? Here’s why your degree’s worth is stagnant.]

But what kinds of jobs are campuses supposed to be preparing students for? How does anyone know what the job market might look like in two or four years? Entire industries are disappearing almost overnight, and legacy companies are quickly changing course. In one recent year, Gardner told me, Procter & Gamble hired graduates from 86 different majors at Michigan State, reflecting both its new lines of business and its eagerness to hedge its bets to find the right match.

As a result of these trends in the labor market, college seniors these days no longer have as clear or straightforward a career path as previous generations did. They are part of a much more complex, fragmented workforce with many overlapping pathways. Compared to their parents, who had maps with clearly marked trails for their careers, these soon-to-be graduates face wide-open seas as they chart their next 30-plus years.

Hard Truths Every Job Seeker Should Know

To find success in your job search, you can't have any false assumptions. Too often, talented people find themselves upended because they were surprised about something they didn’t know or expect. Here are six things you should keep in mind throughout your job hunt as explaind by  Arnie Fertig

1. You need to have the necessary skills and experience to get a job. “I would have loved that job and could have figured out how to do it with some training and help along the way.” Employers hire people because they are convinced those hires already have the skills and experience to do a job well. That doesn’t mean you can’t make a significant career change. But no matter the circumstance, you need to somehow demonstrate a strong basis of relevant skills and experience upon which a hiring manager can predict your success.

2. Just because you have the required skills and experience doesn’t mean you will get the job. From an employer’s standpoint, the hiring process is about much more than matching candidate skills and experience with a job opening’s stated requirements. They also carefully consider that elusive quality called “fit.” While it isn’t a very satisfying reason to hear when you are rejected, “fit” can include personality, temperament, career progression and a host of other legitimate elements.

3. You will likely be asked the salary question in your first conversation. Be prepared for it. Rather than fumbling or becoming rattled, give a respectful answer that highlights a current or recent compensation level. Make it clear that you understand that the salary in this job will be different because the role, environment, cost of living and other factors will be different. Then, quickly deflect the conversation back to talking about the value you offer rather than the cost you represent as a new hire.

 

4. Employers are interested in your key accomplishments and how you attained them – not your job description. You can pretty much assume that serious candidates for a given role will all have histories of more or less similar responsibilities. When you begin bullet points on your résumé with “Responsible for …” you lump yourself in with the rest of the candidates and provide no reason why your background is superior to theirs.

As an alternative, use a CAR – challenge, action, result – statement. Explain one of your responsibilities, and then highlight what you actually did and what value resulted from your actions. Here's an example:

Challenge: Grow and transform a fallow sales territory with few accounts into a vibrant and consistent revenue stream.

  • Crafted a business plan and obtained buy-in from management. Prospected, formed new relationships and closed XXX new accounts resulting in $YYY of revenue.

5. Employers aren’t interested in what you did in 1997. There is no need to highlight skills or expertise that are passe. If you surfed the World Wide Web using Netscape Navigator, composed documents in WordPerfect for DOS and made Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheets, no one cares. Really! The same is true about listing jobs you held more than 10 to 15 years ago. Like or not, in almost every instance, they are no longer relevant. In the interest of honesty, it is very reasonable to include a line like this in your résumé, under the earliest position: “Details of prior experience are available upon request.”

6. Sour grapes make you sour. Even if you only apply to jobs for which you believe yourself to be well-qualified or even perfect, no job is a shoo-in. You will get rejections. Sometimes you’ll get many rejections. Stuff happens. Maybe your résumé wasn't read. Maybe the hiring manager wasn’t smart enough to figure out how great you really are. It’s possible that the job was “hard-wired” for someone else.

 

The good news is that all signs point to a strong hiring cycle this year for new graduates. Eight out of every 10 employers describe the college labor market as good to excellent, according to an annual survey by the Collegiate Employment Research Institute at Michigan State University, which received responses from more than 4,300 employers. Nearly 90 percent of them hired a new graduate last year, and all of them expect to hire again this year.

But even such rosy numbers won’t give parents of college seniors less anxiety about their return on the college investment until their children move out of the house and start making ends meet on their own. And for this generation of college graduates, making that transition from school to career is more treacherous now than it was for graduates even a decade ago, said Phil Gardner, director of the Michigan State employment center.

“College students are enjoying the longest run in job growth since the late 1990s, but that doesn’t mean navigating the job market is easy,” he told me.

Three primary developments in the job market make it more difficult for today’s graduates compared to their parents.

First, Gardner said, the size and makeup of companies recruiting on campuses has shifted, altering the entire hiring process. In the 1980s, campus recruiting was dominated by three primary industries— manufacturing, retail and finance— and a few big corporations controlled each of those sectors. That meant the big employers set the recruiting calendar, and everyone else followed along. It was an easy process for students and campuses to understand. In 1985, GM and Dow Chemical, combined, hired 340 Michigan State graduates, Gardner told me. In recent years, those two companies hired only a few dozen students from Michigan State.

There are more employers today, each of them recruiting fewer students, and all have specific needs and timetables for students to track. Companies that build things no longer dominate the economy; business and professional services that reorganize those old-line companies now do.

Nonprofit and government agencies also loom over hiring in a way they didn’t in the past. Teach for America and AmeriCorps are among the top 10 destinations for Michigan State graduates today, and several other nonprofit organizations fill spots in the top 15. In the 1980s, nonprofits occupied none of those spots. In a nationwide survey, more than 40 percent of the class of 2015 said they wanted to work for the government, at the federal, state or local level.

[Want more jobs? Give high school students more exposure to training for a variety of careers]

Second, employers have raised the bar on the skills workers need to start a job on day one and are less involved in employee training. Young adults are largely on their own to acquire those skills. Doing so becomes increasingly challenging because the rules keep shifting. Only a quarter of companies have specific hiring targets when they start campus recruiting, according to surveys by Michigan State.

Workplaces are engaging in more on-demand or last-minute hiring, so students can’t know even months in advance what they need to know for a job, let alone before signing up for classes or before picking a major.

“We’re asking 23-year-old new graduates to act like 35-year-old experienced workers,” Gardner said.

In the old days, Fortune 500 companies put new hires into “rotational programs” that allowed them to move around different departments to learn about the company and its culture, as well as various jobs. Many of those programs have been eliminated in corporate cost-cutting.

The third major development, according to Gardner, is the increased velocity of today’s economy. Entire industries have been disrupted by technology and globalization in recent years, even stalwarts like law, accounting and medicine.

Yet colleges are under more pressure than ever to help their students find precise routes into careers when those routes don’t exist anymore. In a 2015 survey by the Chronicle of Higher Education, two-thirds of college leaders said more discussions about job preparation were occurring on campus compared with just three years earlier.

[Is a college degree the new high school diploma? Here’s why your degree’s worth is stagnant.]

But what kinds of jobs are campuses supposed to be preparing students for? How does anyone know what the job market might look like in two or four years? Entire industries are disappearing almost overnight, and legacy companies are quickly changing course. In one recent year, Gardner told me, Procter & Gamble hired graduates from 86 different majors at Michigan State, reflecting both its new lines of business and its eagerness to hedge its bets to find the right match.

As a result of these trends in the labor market, college seniors these days no longer have as clear or straightforward a career path as previous generations did. They are part of a much more complex, fragmented workforce with many overlapping pathways. Compared to their parents, who had maps with clearly marked trails for their careers, these soon-to-be graduates face wide-open seas as they chart their next 30-plus years.